Archive by category | Natural disasters

Western Himalayan region faces big quake risk

Western Himalayan region faces big quake risk

The Kashmir region in northwestern India could experience a magnitude 9 earthquake — several times larger than previously assumed. The revised risk estimate is worrying, says Roger Bilham of the University of Colorado, Boulder, who presented the results on 7 December at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco. “There are many cities and megacities in the region. And there are a couple of nuclear power plants there too,” he says. “You have two nuclear powers facing each other, armed to the teeth, facing a huge amount of damage”. Bilham speculates that perhaps 300,000 people might die in such an earthquake, not counting subsequent problems from political turmoil between India and Kashmir, or flooding.  Read more

Fracking caused British quakes

Fracking caused British quakes

A UK energy company has admitted that their hydraulic fracturing project (commonly known as ‘fracking’) probably caused a few surprisingly large earthquakes in Lancashire this spring. But, their report into the events concludes, it should be safe to continue operations in the area. Protesters disagree.  Read more

New quake rocks Japan

Another powerful earthquake has just hit the disaster region in north-eastern Japan. The magnitude 7.4 quake, probably an aftershock of the magnitude 9.0 quake on March 11, occurred at 13.1 kilometres depth 330 kilometres northeast of Tokyo, according to the US Geological Survey. A tsunami warning was issued, but has now been lifted.

Earthquake triggering, and why we don’t know where the next big one will strike

Earthquake triggering, and why we don’t know where the next big one will strike

As I came through airport security in Connecticut, upon presentation of my California driver’s license, the TSA officer asked me, “Aren’t you folks worried about how that big Japan quake is going to hit you next?” I was glad to be able to tell him that we’re not any more worried than we were before, and that a writer had just made that up. I didn’t ask him where he got that idea, but on my mind already was Simon Winchester’s column in Newsweek magazine on March 13. The article was wrong, and that fact has gotten a lot of traction in the blogosphere—and in real newspapers, if a distinction still exists.

High radiation levels outside Fukushima evacuation zone

High radiation levels outside Fukushima evacuation zone

As more radiation monitoring equipment arrives in Fukushima prefecture, we’re starting to get a sense of just how far the radioactive material from the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant is travelling. Surprisingly high doses have been seen outside the evacuation zone set up by the government.

Helping hand for scientist-refugees

Research facilities have been destroyed by the recent earthquakes and tsunami in Japan, and fear over radiation has brought work to halt at afar greater number of laboratories throughout the Tokyo area. The setback for science will be great, and many in Japan are wondering whether they will ever get their careers back on track. For scientists who are forced to close their labs or who do chose to evacuate, there might be hope. Researchers living outside of Japan are trying to think of ways to help scientist-refugees.