Archive by category | Publishing

Special focus on genome instability

Special focus on genome instability

The March issue of Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology presents a web focus on genome instability. The integrity of the genome is crucial for tumour suppression and for the propagation of genomic information to subsequent generations. DNA damage can result from cellular metabolism, exogenous genotoxic agents or routine errors in DNA replication and recombination. To combat these attacks and maintain genome integrity, cells have evolved a response system that induces cell cycle arrest, allowing sufficient time for DNA repair by specialized proteins. The DNA damage response system activates the appropriate DNA repair pathway or, in the case of irreparable damage, induces apoptosis. The special focus contains research highlights, review articles, a journal club and a NPG library of related articles. There is also a brief editors’ summary of the contents.  Read more

How publishers are adding value

How publishers are adding value

Grace Baynes of Nature Publishing group was interviewed by Dick Kaser last week on Infotoday blog, the conference blog by the editors of Information Today. In this video interview, she “notes that while 2008 and 2009 may have been about developing and deploying products with social networking capabilities, the opportunities that lie ahead require content and business model innovation. She suggests that publishers think about Open Access, mobile devices and ebook readers. Some may also need to rethink pricing and licensing terms.”  … Read more

Web-based scholarly communication in chemistry

Web-based scholarly communication in chemistry

New web-based models of scholarly communication have made a significant impact in some scientific disciplines, but chemistry is not one of them. What has prevented the widespread adoption of these developments by chemists — and what are the prospects for adoption over time? These controversial questions are addressed by Theresa Velden and Carl Lagoze of Cornell University in a Commentary in the December issue of Nature Chemistry (1, 673-678; 2009). The authors write:  … Read more

NPG’s annual letter to customers (2009)

Nature Publishing Group’s managing director, Stephen Inchcoombe, has just written his annual letter to the company’s customers. NPG’s customers are varied: as well as authors and peer-reviewers, they include readers, subscribers, librarians, institutions, advertisers, suppliers, partners, sponsors, and more. The annual letter is, necessarily, broad, so I’ll highlight here a few points of particular interest to authors:  … Read more

New NPG journal: Cell Death & Disease

Via press release: Nature Publishing Group (NPG) and the Associazione Differenziamento e Morte Cellulare (ADMC) have announced a new open access journal, Cell Death & Disease. Launching in January 2010, Cell Death & Disease will explore the area of cell death from a translational medicine perspective. The journal is now accepting submissions.  Read more

Data sharing discussed at Nature and Nature Network

Sharing data is good. But sharing your own data? That can get complicated. As two research communities who held meetings on this question in Rome and in Toronto in May report their proposals to promote data sharing in biology, a special issue of Nature (10 September 2009) examines the cultural and technical hurdles that can get in the way of good intentions. Some of the authors of these proposals are participating in two online forums (Rome and Toronto) at Nature Network – so please accept our invitation to visit and have your say on these questions.  Read more

Short is sweet, says EMBO reports

Scientific publishing seems to be moving in several contradictory directions. Against these conflicting trends, EMBO reports seeks to re-assert the importance of the short-format article, carrying a single key message of ground-breaking significance. So writes the journal’s Editor, Howie Jacobs (EMBO reports 10, 935; 2009). Against a background of screeds of scientific articles, blogs and other commentary available on the internet, and vast mountains of supplementary information and data, the short-format of EMBO reports is increasingly popular. From the Editorial:  … Read more