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Nature’s Middle East portal

Nature’s Middle East portal

The Arab world has a rich history of scientific enquiry. During the Golden Age of Science, the Arab world was influenced by texts from neighbouring regions of Greece, Persia and India, and built on them with great discoveries and inventions such as algebra, optics, medicine and many others. For more than 500 years Arabic was the language of science. Following translation into Latin, Arabic scholarship fed back to these neighbouring regions and helped lay the foundation for the European enlightenment and current Western science.  Read more

Nature announces winners of 2009 mentoring awards

Nature announces winners of 2009 mentoring awards

On 1 December, the winners of the 2009 Nature Awards for Creative Mentoring – the 5th since the competition’s inception in 2005 – were announced at the British Embassy in Tokyo. For the 2009 awards, nominations were invited from Japan – the first time that researchers from an Asian country have been honoured. Two awards were made, one for lifetime achievement and the other for mid-career achievement.  Read more

Nature Materials looks to second worlds

Nature Materials looks to second worlds

Virtual worlds such as Second Life present an intriguing premise for scientific use. But are the benefits sufficiently clear for widespread uptake? In a Commentary in the current (December) issue of Nature Materials ( 8, 919-921; 2009), Tim Jones discusses the advantages virtual worlds allow in the context of science and science communication, including allowing research collaborators to meet in a virtual space, or larger events such as talks where the audience can interact with each other.  Read more

Poster on the rise of p53 at Nature Reviews

Poster on the rise of p53 at Nature Reviews

Nature Reviews Cancer and Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology present a free poster on the rise of p53, by Bert Vogelstein and Carol Prives. “In 1979 the discovery of p53 was reported. The gene encoding p53 (TP53) was initially believed to be an oncogene but 10 years later it was correctly characterized as a tumour suppressor, which led to a steep rise in p53 research. We now know that the protein encoded by TP53 — one of the most commonly mutated tumour suppressor genes in human cancer — regulates many important biological activities and is itself regulated through post-translational modifications that are induced by sensors of cell stress.  Read more

Nature Medicine and Nature Biotechnology announce the SciCafé

Following on from yesterday’s post about schemes to involve the general public in the daily lives of scientific researchers, Nature Medicine and Nature Biotechnology announce an initiative to connect commercially oriented academics with their local business community (Nat. Med. 15, 1095; 2009). The SciCafé is a series of networking events in Boston and San Francisco that help researchers connect with investors and serial entrepreneurs.  Read more

NPG to publish Polymer Journal

The Society of Polymer Science, Japan (SPSJ) and Nature Publishing Group (NPG) are pleased to announce a partnership to publish the society’s leading international journal Polymer Journal. From July 2009, articles will be freely available. Further developments will culminate in January 2010 when the full site is launched.  Read more

The Nature Big Science Debate: A Biological Century?

On Monday 8 June, Nature is hosting The Big Science Debate: A Biological Century? The event starts at 7 p.m. at Kings Place 90 York Way, London NI. Physics, biology and chemistry have all helped define the twentieth century. Many world-changing innovations from physics include electric power, the microchip and the internal combustion engine. In biology and chemistry, an agricultural revolution has helped to feed a growing population. But some of these advances have also helped to create climate change and a rate of species-loss not seen since the last mass extinction. What will physics and biology look like 50 years from now? And what might the impacts be?  Read more