Archive by category | Communication

Science books to inspire new generations

Science books to inspire new generations

Five leading writers of science books are offering advice for budding authors in a series of interviews running from 4 Feb to 4 March in Nature‘s Books & Arts section. Researchers should be recognized for writing books to convey and develop science, according to an Editorial in Nature last week ( 463, 588; 4 February 2010, free to read online). Here is an extract:  … Read more

Are smartphones making inroads into the laboratory?

Are smartphones making inroads into the laboratory?

Mobile computing platforms such as the iPhone are beginning to make inroads into the laboratory—serious prospect or fairy tale? So asks Nature Methods (7, 87; 2010), starting its February Editorial in traditional genre style: “Once upon a time phones were used exclusively for conversing with other people, and computers ran software applications. The computer became an indispensable tool in the laboratory while the phone developed into a mobile device that has disrupted countless lectures at scientific conferences. But recently researchers can be seen talking on their computer and using their cell phone for running fancy—and sometimes powerful—software programs.  Read more

Nature Materials looks to second worlds

Nature Materials looks to second worlds

Virtual worlds such as Second Life present an intriguing premise for scientific use. But are the benefits sufficiently clear for widespread uptake? In a Commentary in the current (December) issue of Nature Materials ( 8, 919-921; 2009), Tim Jones discusses the advantages virtual worlds allow in the context of science and science communication, including allowing research collaborators to meet in a virtual space, or larger events such as talks where the audience can interact with each other.  Read more

Web-based scholarly communication in chemistry

Web-based scholarly communication in chemistry

New web-based models of scholarly communication have made a significant impact in some scientific disciplines, but chemistry is not one of them. What has prevented the widespread adoption of these developments by chemists — and what are the prospects for adoption over time? These controversial questions are addressed by Theresa Velden and Carl Lagoze of Cornell University in a Commentary in the December issue of Nature Chemistry (1, 673-678; 2009). The authors write:  … Read more

Nature Immunology on a common language of science

Nature Immunology on a common language of science

Science and technology can be used to build relations between countries. Thus, scientific diplomacy is becoming increasingly important, and is the subject of Nature Immunology’s December Editorial (10, 1223; 2009). The use of science diplomacy has taken a back seat in the many years since President Nixon signed the Science and Technology Cooperation Agreement between China and the United States.  Read more

Nature Medicine’s wake-up call on intellectual property rights

Intellectual-property protection is a key driver of innovation, and researchers are always keen to file patents to shield their discoveries. Yet scientists often have an uninformed view of the value of their intellectual property. This naiveté slows down translational research. So concludes the November Editorial in Nature Medicine (15, 1229; 2009).  Read more