London Blog

Science Events In London This Week: 15 – 22 November

Monday

One in a quite cool series of talks at Waterstones, Marcus Cheown tells us 10 things you didn’t know about the Solar System. Highlight: Did you know that the planet Uranus was originally called “George”? £8, book in advance.

Tuesday

James Burke is the speaker tonight at the RI in 1+1 = 3, looking at connective nature of innovation and its social effects, the idea that two ideas come together to make a much bigger impact than either alone. With this in mind, what does the internet mean for our future? 7pm; book now.

Over at UCL, the SCI looks at The properties of fats, wisely choosing chocolate as their use case. 6pm; free.

Wednesday

The Grant Museum looks at the biology of fantasy. Mythological creatures including fairies and dragons are common and often winged, but are they biologically feasible? UCL’s Professor Roger Wotton investigates. 6pm; free.

Meanwhile for those of you who remember Sim City, the Dana Centre tonight asks what the city of the future should look like. With green issues in mind, what should be different and what would you do? 7pm; free but book.

Thursday

The Royal Society of Chemistry looks at the woman responsible for 2011 being International Year of Chemistry: The three lives of Marie Curie. 6:30pm; also available to watch online.

Over at the Royal Observatory, science meets religion with Diwali under the stars telling the story of the Hindu Gods under the night sky. 6:30pm; £20, book now.

Saturday/Sunday

A late entry for title of the week: Whose mind is it anyway? How do you know I’m not a zombie?= This gem comes from the Bishopsgate Institute who on Saturday at 2:30pm will be asking questions like “You can be pretty sure you’re conscious. But how do you know I am too? I walk like you, talk like you – but am I really like you? Can we ever know what goes on in someone else’s mind? And why are zombies of scientific interest for this?” Free.

You can follow the Nature Network London Google calendar of events in London at http://blogs.nature.com/london/2011/05/17/scientific-events-calendar. Updated daily.

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